June 6,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

LA Times – The dramedy “The Year of Spectacular Men” is a family affair. The film, which opens Friday, was directed by actress Lea Thompson and written by her daughter Madelyn Deutch, who also wrote the music and costars in the film with her sister Zoey Deutch, who co-produced it along with their father, director Howard Deutch.

So what’s it like to work on a labor of love with your family? We asked all three to write about the experience.

Lea Thompson, director:

From its first breath as just a title, “The Year of Spectacular Men” has been a part of our family for over four years.When Madelyn let me read the first draft, I was blown away by her skill and honesty. I had never directed a feature and I was honored she trusted me enough to partner up. When it actually came together, I knew it was important to create a space for my young writer to tell her own story with her own words because in my ingenue days every one of my words was written by an older man.

I envisioned it to be elegantly shot — the sets would be lush and tell their own stories. The “Spectacular Men” would each be distinctly wonderful, and we would shoot it as written, in four cities (New York, Lake Tahoe, San Francisco and L.A.) in all four seasons. All that for the same budget that “Dancing with the Stars” has for sequins.

Thankfully, our producers at Parkside Pictures were amazing and so committed to the difficult scope of our project. And we had such a fantastic cast — Avan Jogia, Nicholas Braun, Jesse Bradford, Cameron Monaghan, Brandon T. Jackson, Zach Roerig — and crew, who somehow trusted us enough to sign on to such a unique collaboration between family members — the kind of thing that could end in tragedy, but luckily it was some kind of wonderful.

The creation of this film has taught me so much about myself, my craft, and most importantly, the mysterious inner workings of my daughters’ minds. After working in the arts for over 40 years, it has been invigorating to not only learn new things but to get my chance to help create something new from scratch, and tell a fresh story using all that I have been given from the thousands of people I have worked with as a dancer, singer, actress and director.Making this film with my daughters, whom I deeply respect and admire, is a blessing come true. And also … #funfact: “Daughter” and “laughter” are just one letter apart.

Madelyn Deutch, writer, composer, costar:

Making “The Year of Spectacular Men” felt like being a little kid again. Every room we went in told us female-fronted comedies were the riskiest investments. But the more we were told no, the scrappier we got, the harder we trudged. So you can imagine that by the time we sheer-willed our way onto set, it felt like we had tricked the establishment and gotten away with it.

Here we were, with a female director and producer and writer and composer and … it was a snow day. It was ditching school for the beach. Playing hooky sans consequences. A series of small miracles that deter you from your ordinary. The best damn sleep-away camp of your life — and you didn’t even get homesick.

I remember crying when we wrapped shooting in San Francisco. I had just done one of my last scenes as “Izzy,” the film’s lead, and I had no idea how to say goodbye to her. She became that friend from camp I shared the same scrapes and inside jokes with, who was down to drink too much Captain and Coke, and braid tacky rainbow-colored lanyards. The friend who slept in the top bunk with me, even though she had her own. I didn’t want to climb down that ladder and go back to trying to be an adult.

Still, I feel so much joy for what we accomplished. Completing a project like this is often a years long journey and I’m proud that our mission statement remains true: We made the movie we intended to make.

Of course, myself and my character Izzy are examples of privilege, of a snapshot into a pretty particular world — but we were also just young women. With self-esteem deficits, buried trauma and a skillfully uncalculated approach. Universal things as far as I could tell. So, that was the film that I wrote. It was the film we shot. The film we cut. The film we sold. The film that’s being released. Our consistent dedication to seeing that specific vision through, may be the element I’m most impressed by. And the fact that I have a mother and sister who were willing to do it with me.

Zoey Deutch, costar, producer :

“The Year of Spectacular Men” is about as grassroots and personal as it gets. I mean, my mom directed it, my sister wrote, starred in and scored it, my ex-boyfriend played my boyfriend, I produced alongside my dad. And everyone still speaks, and no one lost any limbs, and we made a really good film.

It’s hard to know how influential or special something will be while you’re doing it, and so hard to appreciate and practice gratitude in the moment… Life is cumulative: It’s all the tiny little things along the way. But when I watched the movie for the first time, it wasn’t all the decisions of filmmaking I was reminded of that made this piece of art something I’m so proud of. It was the family dinners my parents were so adamant we had together every night growing up. It was the strength of my parents’ choice to not squash me and my sister’s spirits. It was the arguments we had but worked through and didn’t ignore. It was forgiveness. It was the love and support our family has had for one another. It’s all the tiny little things along the way.

As artists who have chosen collaborative art forms, we are so used to being at the mercy of many strangers’ opinions, wants and decisions. Making this film was empowering because it gave us control and showed us we could do it. It gave us the confidence to tell our fellow artists and friends who feel overwhelmed by the process, that they can do it too.

It seems impossible, until it’s done, until you do it.

We did do it… and Deutch Family Films is just getting started.

June 6,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

On June 06, Zoey DeutchMadelyn Deutch and their mom Lea Thompson were bothin attendance at The Year of Spectacular Men premiere at AMC Dine-In Sunset 5 on Wednesday (June 6) in Los Angeles.

The movie is also a family affair: Zoey and Madelyn‘s mom Lea Thompson, also co-stars in the movie, and father Howard Deutch is a co-producer. Zoey is also a co-producer, Lea directed, and Madelyn wrote the movie and also provides the music!

The movie, which hits theaters on June 15, is the story of Izzy Klein, a young woman fresh out of college who strikes up and ruins relationships with several men, and struggles to navigate the failures of post-college adulthood, leaning on her mother and older sister for support.

Zoey was wearing is wearing a Dior dress. An after party sponsored by Guillotine Vodka was held later that night at sbe’s Hyde Sunset.

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Public Appearances > 2018 > Jun 06 – “The Year Of Spectacular Men” Premiere in Los Angeles, California

Public Appearances > 2018 > Jun 06 – “The Year Of Spectacular Men” Premiere After-Party in Los Angeles

June 6,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

Zoey Deutch attended the Los Angeles Confidential Celebration for its May/June Issue with Cover Star Zoey Deutch at Montage Beverly Hills on May 31, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California.

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Public Appearances > 2018 > May 31 – Los Angeles Confidential Celebrates its May/June Issue in Beverly Hills

May 5,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

Coveteur – When we meet up with Zoey Deutch, the actress, director, and budding producer is in her room at Hotel du Cap Eden Roc in Antibes, France, with a wide view of the Mediterranean from her balcony. Cannes, where the annual film festival is about to begin, is so close we can see it across the water. But tonight Deutch is getting ready for a party inland with Dior, who is hosting her in France and dressing her for a party celebrating the Miss Dior fragrance. Her makeup is already finished with a rust-toned eyeshadow (from Dior palettes Heat Up and Inflame) by makeup artist Kelsey Deenihan. It gives an edge to her otherwise pristine white-and-black ensemble and plays off her signature red hair—a color, we learn, that was blended by Hollywood’s favorite colorist, Tracey Cunningham.

She gives me the formulas for local colorists to use when I’m filming in another city, or she gives me the dye so I can do my own roots,” says Deutch, hopping from a chair where her hairstylist just finished a few face-framing waves. “I’ve gotten really good at doing my own roots.

The favor is particularly appreciated these days, as 24-year-old Deutch finds herself on more and more sets both in front of the camera and behind it. Last year she saw the release of five of her films, including her producing credit for The Year of Spectacular Men, and this year she already has two films in post-production. Later, when we meet with Deutch again at the party, we’re at Christian Dior’s former home in Grasse, Château de La Colle Noire, and take a seat side by side on what used to be Dior’s own bed. We, of course, have plenty of questions queuing in our head—from the frivolous How do you get that *skin*? to the nosy What’s like to grow up in Hollywood with a legendary mom like Lea Thompson? to the selfish What are your best career secrets? And we got the answers for you below.

Can you tell me a little bit about growing up with parents in the entertainment industry, and the career wisdom you learned from them?

“It’s been my great fortune to be surrounded by people that have reminded me of how important process is, not outcome. When you’re an actor, or really an artist of a collaborative form, you have so little control of the outcome. And if you are only focused on that…it won’t turn out well [laughs]. If you’re focused on the outcome, chances are you’re focused on people’s perceptions of the outcome—how much money something makes, how it looks, rather than how it feels. And I think that has been the most valuable—one of the most valuable—lessons I’ve learned is to really appreciate, recognize, and practice the process, not the outcome.”

Do you think this is part of why you’re getting more and more into producing?

“Yeah, I think it was something that I realized I loved so much. And it gives me an opportunity to have some semblance of control. I also enjoy being a part of every single piece of the puzzle. It’s fun for me.”

And I sense that you have a very clear vision:

“I do, but I think more important than that is learning how to harness that and listen to other people. I think it’s really easy to have a vision. But again, when you’re an artist and you’ve chosen a collaborative art form as your path, it’s massively important to be not just a good listener, but to learn how to listen. I don’t know if that makes any sense.”

Have you noticed that there is a difference in the creative process, like when somebody really knows how to listen?

“Yeah, I also think—I don’t know if you feel like this in your experience, and your career and life… I hate to put people into categories, but there are people that allow other people to do their jobs, and then there are other people that micromanage other people doing their jobs. And it’s a really fine balance because if you really are somebody that wants to have a hand in every single pie, and wants to be a part of the whole process… It’s a really delicate line to balance.”

Do you feel like you’ve been able to kind of gain a lot of wisdom from your parents and your family?

“To be entirely honest, I think it’s hard to have perspective on that. I’ve always been very honest about feeling deep gratitude to my parents for being really good people and really good at their jobs, so it didn’t steer me away. I knew that it was possible to be in this industry and it not be a complete shit-show. Both my parents are nice, and they work so hard. And it really is about process, not outcome, for them. I’ve just watched them be good humans [laughs].”

Is there a subject that you’re really passionate about right now?

“I think it’s really crazy that there haven’t been movies made about Margaret Sanger or Hedy Lamarr… I just think that that’s interesting.”

OK! Change of subject. Favorite beauty go-tos… We were talking about coloring your own hair:

“Me and my mom do my sister’s hair, and they’re a brunette and a blonde. We have our little salon. We do my mom’s roots and the whole thing [laughs]. We’re mixing colors and throwing shit [laughs].”

Do you have a skin routine that you swear by?

“Do you have an hour and a half [laughs]? I go to [facialist] Shani Darden. I have struggled in the past with hormonal stuff. I really like IS Clinical—their cleanser and their active serum is fantastic. I just started using the Sisley—the Black Rose moisturizer—and I love that. It’s a cream. But I’m very hesitant toward scented moisturizers. I usually am just like, ‘Screw it. I’m going for Cetaphil.’ I don’t want to risk it. I am a new lover of [Sisley]. I haven’t tried anything else except that moisturizer. I’m obsessed with it. Honestly, I love witch hazel. I know it sounds like a bizarre drugstore thing. Witch hazel as a toner. It is very intense. It closes your pores.”

Do you wear makeup?

“I love the Dior eyebrow pencil because it has a little brush on the back. I love peach shadows. And then I use the Dior [Undercover Star Concealer] wand for my skin, and then I use Clé de Peau concealer for under the eyes.”

For fragrance, you said you’ve long worn Miss Dior:

“I know, it’s like, ‘Really, Zoey?’ I know it seems overly fitting. I refuse to throw out any of the Miss Dior bottles because they have the little bows on them. I actually tried to break one so that I could put like, roses in it. And they are very sturdy bottles. I think it broke part of the wall instead of the actual bottle. I alternate my fragrance. I wear Miss Dior, but I also wear Lys 41 Le Labo. [I like] very floral. I don’t like a musk sort of thing. I really love roses. I love roses and gardenias and peonies, and that sort of feminine, beautiful kind of thing.”

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Photoshoots & Portraits > 2018 > Coveteur

May 5,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

“We did it. We made two miserable people happy!” Netflix has debuted the first official trailer for a new romantic comedy titled Set It Up, arriving in the middle of June to liven up your summer days. Set It Up is the feature directorial debut of TV director/editor Claire Scanlon, and the story follows two assistants for executives in New York City, who try to set up their bosses to fall in love. As usual, not only does comedy ensue, but all kinds of romantic sparks fly and awkward things happen. Zoey Deutch and Glen Powellstar, with Lucy Liu and Taye Diggs, as well as Noah RobbinsJon RudnitskyTituss BurgessPete DavidsonShyrley Rodriguez, and Meredith Hagner.

New York assistants, Harper (Zoey Deutch) and Charlie (Glen Powell), are used to going above and beyond for their high-powered (and highly demanding) bosses, Kristen (Lucy Liu) and Rick (Taye Diggs). But now they’re teaming up for the biggest projects of their young careers — getting their bosses to fall in love! Only time will tell whether they strike out… or score a home run.

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Movies > Set It Up > Trailer

May 5,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

Yesterday (11), the trailer of “The Year of Spectacular Men” was released ! The film featuring Zoey Deutch and Madelyn Deutch is Lea Thompson‘s directorial debut.

The film is about Izzy (Madelyn Deutch) who is on the verge of a quarter-life crisis.She’s in crisis mode because she has just moved to a new city, is a little envious of her famous younger sister Sabrina (Zoey Deutch), and recently ended things with her boyfriend Aaron (Jesse Bradford of Bring It On fame). She’s at a cross-roads, and she’s getting advice from her eccentric Four Loko-drinking mom (Lea Thompson).

The new trailer, premiered exclusively on Refinery29.

The Year of Spectacular Men hits theaters and VOD this June.

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Movies > The Year of Spetacular Man > Trailer

May 5,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

On May 07, Zoey Deutch attended the Christian Dior Cocktail and Dinner At Chateau de la Colle Noire in Mandelieu-la-Napoule, France. Check the pics in our gallery:

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Public Appearances > 2018 > May 07 – Parfums Christian Dior Cocktail And Dinner At La Colle Noire in Mandelieu-la-Napoule, France

May 5,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

Zoey Deucth attended the the Communities In Schools Annual Celebration on May 01st night at the Skirball Cultural Center. The Communities in Schools Los Angeles is an organization dedicated to preventing students from dropping out of high school, during their annual celebration they honored the volunteers who made their work possible.

CIS Los Angeles serves over 12,000 students in the Los Angeles Unified School District and has been able to successfully raise the graduation rate across the district.

Zoey was wearing a back Fedi dress. Check the pics in our gallery:

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Public Appearances > 2018 > May 01 – Communities In Schools Annual Celebration in Los Angeles

May 5,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

Unafraid and unrehearsed, Zoey Deutch is the most down-to-earth rising star born to two ’80s Hollywood powerhouses you’ll ever meet.

Zoey Deutch is stuck in traffic. The Los Angeles native is clearly accustomed to gridlock, because she proceeds to describe it over the phone with the smooth and appraising air of a connoisseur. “I’m not sure if you’re familiar with L.A. traffic, but it is the most fun,” she jokes. “A thrill.” Seconds later, the actress briefly interrupts our conversation to honk at an aggressive driver who has just darted into her lane (I can hear the beep of her horn—it’s quick and direct, as even-tempered and levelheaded as a honk can get). “I’m so sorry this is happening,Deutch apologizes. “Thank you for going with it. You’re so nice.

For the record, Deutch is the nice one. The 23-year-old actress seems genuinely concerned about me, and I’m genuinely concerned about… me. I want to ask Deutch about her latest projects, her meteoric ascent to stardom, but haven’t found an artful way to steer the conversation away from traffic (“Hey, you know what isn’t stuck in the slow lane? Your career!”). And because Deutch is a busy actress with a very busy schedule, I’m keenly aware that every passing moment is a missed opportunity. So I blurt out a question about the Academy Awards, which Deutch recently attended in an eco-conscious couture gown by Elie Saab—a look that was put together by her stylist, Elizabeth Stewart, and roundly praised by the fashion community. “That was so powerful,Deutch says of the Oscars. “I was able to watch all of my heroes celebrate their work. And then I got to mingle and trip over things and desperately search for snacks.

And there it is. Into this static-filled connection, Deutch reveals all of the qualities that make her a rare and compelling figure in Hollywood. She’s a major star without a major ego, a leading lady who can appreciate both high art and snack food. She stays grounded in the glare of the spotlight and seems to have a natural immunity to hype.

The question is: How?

The daughter of actress Lea Thompson (Back to the Future) and director Howard Deutch (Pretty in Pink), Zoey Deutch grew up in the San Fernando Valley “surrounded by cool artists.” I ask Deutch if she thinks her close proximity to the business might account for her pragmatic view of it. “Look, all artists pull from their personal experiences, and anyone who tells you that isn’t the case is out of their mind,” she says. “But growing up in this business definitely gave me a unique perspective on the job. I learned early on to value preparation. I take that seriously.

In other words, Deutch does her homework—and it shows. The young actress has built an impressive catalog of work since her big-screen debut in 2013’s Beautiful Creatures, in which she holds her own alongside the likes of Emma Thompson, Viola Davis and Jeremy Irons. But it’s in the new indie film Flower that Deutch finds a vehicle for her startling versatility and is able to display her deep commitment to her craft. Deutch plays Erica Vandross, a proudly irreverent 17-year-old who uses her sexuality to extort money from older, ostensibly powerful men who take advantage of people. “The character felt so complicated, frustrating and fragile to me,” says Deutch. “My initial thoughts when I read the script were, ‘I can’t believe they’re going to let me make a movie where the central character gets to do this kind of stuff and talk like that.’ I feel like I’ve been sitting on the sidelines watching all my male actor friends get to play parts like this.

To prepare for what she calls a “dream role, Deutch read books on “teenage angst and struggle,” such as Beatrice Sparks’ Go Ask Alice and Mary Pipher’s Reviving Ophelia. She and director Max Winkler researched borderline personality disorder (“I feel strongly that Erica suffers from it”) and attended a therapy session together. “I was half my character and half myself, and the therapist knew I was playing a part in Max’s film. I know it sounds silly, but it was awesome.

While Deutch tapped into her character’s psychology, the film itself taps into the zeitgeist. “We made this movie before the Harvey story broke,Deutch says, referring to the allegations of sexual assault brought against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein that prompted the global #MeToo movement. “It’s not a secret that this business has a very unequal power struggle and that women have been taken advantage of and preyed upon for as long as its inception. And this movie was written as a way to capture that feeling of powerlessness. It’s not like my character handles it in a productive way—she doesn’t. And even though the movie doesn’t provide answers, it reflects how women want to get some kind of control over their lives.

The message resonates with Deutch, who is an ardent supporter of women’s rights and the Time’s Up campaign against gender discrimination. I ask her if she feels a certain responsibility as a young woman actor to keep the momentum going, and to push hard for change both inside and outside her industry. Her answer is startling—and heartening. “A responsibility? Maybe. But I think what’s even more powerful is that I feel inspired and encouraged to be a strong, independent person. It’s not that I’m being forced to take a stand. I’m excited for the future.

The future may be fixed in her gaze, but Deutch is still committed to realizing longtime goals. Her upcoming project,Set It Up on Netflix, is the result of a pact she and her Everybody Wants Some!! co-star Glen Powell formed a few years ago. “Glen and I vowed that we would find a smart, funny romantic comedy and then we would make it. And we freaking did it.” In the film, Deutch and Powell play overworked, undervalued assistants who coax (read: trap) their bosses into a romantic relationship in order to score a little free time for themselves. The story is lighthearted, playful and easy to digest, but it still manages to unravel stubborn stereotypes, most notably, the cliché of the one-note female love interest. “I feel like it’s a truly feminist version of a romantic comedy,” says Deutch, whose character, Harper, provides the comedic and dramatic substance of the story. “I’ve played a one-dimensional female character in a male-driven comedy before, and that is a very difficult thing to do well,” she says. “You know that famous line about how there are no small parts, only small actors? I think that’s bullshit. As an actor, you really are at the mercy of the words you’re given to say. I will try to follow the well-written word. But I won’t try to manipulate a path for my career. I want to have the opportunity to play different people and keep mixing it up. That’s important to me.

One thing’s for certain: Whichever path or direction Deutch decides to take, the actress will most definitely be in the driver’s seat. Don’t try cutting her off.

Ocean Drive – By Liana Schaffner – Photographed by Tony Duran.

April 4,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

Zoey Deutch was at City Year Los Angeles’ Spring Break: Destination Education event held at Sony Studios on Saturday night (April 28) in Los Angeles.

The actress was joined by Nolan GouldJJ TotahTroian BellisarioMitch GrassiBeau MirchoffNiki KossThomas BarbuscaJustin PrenticeMollee Gray and Steven R. McQueen.

Guests enjoyed booths set up by Aramark, Comcast NBCUniversal, E!, Hulu, JP Morgan Chase/Atom Tickets, Karma Tequila, MarVista, PEOPLE, RealD, Sony, Twentieth Century Fox, Univision, Walmart, and Westfield, among others. The event was attended by 1,400 guests and raised $2.2 million for education!Check the pics in our gallery:

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Public Appearances > 2018 > April 28 – City Year Los Angeles’ Spring Break: Destination Education at Sony Studios in Los Angeles

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