July 7,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

Zoey Deutch joined her mom Lea Thompson and sister Madelyn for a photoshoot and intreview for Allure‘s Good Issue:

Thompson, 57, has two daughters — Zoey, 23, and Madelyn, 27 — who followed in her footsteps when they became actresses. The trio just finished making The Year of Spectacular Men together. “We devised it as a way to give ourselves jobs that we knew nobody was going to,” says Madelyn, who wrote, scored, and acted in the movie. Thompson directed it; Zoey produced and acted in it.

Lea: “As a parent, they always say, ‘It’s not what you say; it’s what you do.’ So I try to model goodness for my children.”

Zoey: “I remember that whenever you’d feel bad or upset or insecure, I’d watch you translate that into doing good for someone else.”

Lea: “I feel strongly that doing little good things all the time is what gives us self-esteem and a sense of self. Being generous, smiling, being kind.”

Madelyn: “Being of service.”

Lea: “I grew up super poor in Minnesota and raised them completely differently. I learned you don’t tell kids that they’re talented and smart. You tell them that they have the things they have because of hard work. They were so understanding that I had to work.”

Madelyn: “You included us in work as much as possible — sets, conflict, all of it. It gave us a sense of responsibility and made us love work.”

Zoey: “It’s been great to look at you like a coworker and a human. There’s all this pressure on mothers to have all the answers, but I respect you enough to know that you won’t be right all the time.”

Lea: “It’s nice, but I mean, I’ll always be your mom. I’ll always yell at you.”

Zoey: “You’ll always annoy us.”

 

July 7,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

Who What Wear

 

This is my last straw.” It’s not the ideal thing to hear from a celebrity you’re interviewing. Zoey Deutch, the actress in question, had just met me in Gemma—
a restaurant that you might recognize for its charming wooden interior or as the background of paparazzi photos of celebrities brunching in the East Village. She’s wearing a red midi-length Miu Miu dress with white flowers scattered all over and a high collar that she adjusts every now and then by reaching behind the nape of her neck where her auburn hair secures neatly in a bun. I take it as an adjustment out of necessity, not nerves, seeing as the 23-year-old instantly strikes me as mature, calm, and professional. Still, the more we talk, the more her playful side emerges. For instance, at the point of the above declaration, she’s holding an iced tea featuring her “last straw,” and then continues with a wink in her voice. “We are going straw-abstinent.” I abide.

We didn’t come here to talk plastic waste, per se, but then again, through the course of our conversation, I enjoy her tiny tangents that go anywhere from musical theater and gel manicures to the gold rush and the pace at which luxury fashion is produced. Through it all, she’s quick to admit she doesn’t think she’s an expert on any of these topics. That said, I feel like I could be speaking to a Who What Wear colleague as I listen to her take on some of the scariest realities about luxury fashion not being able to meet the demands of fast fashion’s immediacy. I nod along and then am surprised when a bit of self-deprecation sneaks in. “I know jack shit about literally everything.

I have a hard time believing this—not just because Deutch proves otherwise several times throughout our multi-topic conversation, but because of her work. The Disney Channel alum had a recurring role on The Suite Life on Deck starting at age 15, but she didn’t take the path of some of her peers who now star in smash hit teen dramas or headline world tours—instead, her résumé is filled with transformative, challenging roles, each approached cerebrally, like “an opportunity to take a class, a crash course on being a new human.” This year alone, Deutch introduced us to a trifecta of new characters, including a deeply troubled teen with an oral fixation in the dark comedy Flower, a neurotic and scheming workaholic in Netflix’s new hit rom-com Set It Up, and a successful actress and sometimes voice-of-reason sister in The Year of Spectacular Men, which is now streaming on Amazon Prime. It’s the last that probably hits closest to home: Her sister, Madelyn, wrote, scored, and stars in the film; her mother, actress Lea Thompson (of Back to the Future fame) directed it; and her father, director and producer Howard Deutch (Pretty in Pink), produced it. Deutch (the one who sits across from me) co-produced the piece.

Some of my friends were shocked when I said I was going to make a movie with my mother,Deutch tell us, echoing a sentiment any young adult with parental figures might relate to. While she looks back on her upbringing around fellow entertainers as a “privilege” and a “blessing,” the stakes of success are different, perhaps even higher, when your chosen line of work happens to be the family business.

As one might expect, Deutch gets asked about her parents a lot—it’s often the first topic of every interview she does (not this one, for the record). “I get it. That’s my life. That’s my history. But at a certain point, it got a little frustrating.” Getting to a place of acting alongside her immediate family and relying on them as professional peers didn’t happen overnight. “Every time somebody asked me about my mom, it felt like they were asking me to compare ourselves. I realized I had to listen to it in a different way… as a celebration. It was a lot of growth to get to that point.

By now though, Deutch lights up when she talks about her family projects and is back in the thick of work. The week before I meet her, my inbox is filled with press releases, as she’s on simultaneous promotional tours for The Year of Spectacular Men and Set It Up. One night it’s a Valentino dress-over-pants ensemble, the next it’s an incredible cornflower blue Delpozo suit—both courtesy of her stylist Elizabeth Stewart—and today she jokes that she’s going to a picnic as she shows me her outfit’s coordinating basket bag.

She’s been busy auditioning too. I can’t help but feel sorry for her when she tells me that this morning alone she’s heard three “hard nos” for projects that have been months of auditions. It’s then I realize perhaps we should have ordered wine, but she assures me it’s not that uncommon and feels okay—“it was mostly just frustrating.

It’s here where I can’t help but draw some parallels between her industry and mine. Fashion loves to move at lightning speed, seeking the next great collection, product, or talent, and it seems like that’s the case for Deutch too. Her sights are set on the next amazing opportunity to act and produce, but ultimately, she wants to learn. “I am so miserable when I’m not working hard,” she says. “I love being exhausted and putting myself out there, embarrassing myself, and working my ass off. But I think the only way to do that for the rest of my life is if I can learn how to chill.

Perhaps it’s because Deutch was propelled into the business faster than other aspiring actors, thanks to her upbringing, or maybe it’s because she’s much smarter than she jokes about, but she articulates her career in a way that isn’t just about being young, hungry, and a hard worker (all of which she is). Her journey is about building something that sustains. Something that takes time. Something that lasts.

It’s akin to the way she views style, favoring the vintage clothing she’s found on thrifting trips with her mother more than “any new fancy-schmancy thing” or wearing an archived Elie Saab gown to the Oscars this year as a partner with Red Carpet Green Dress. It’s even similar to the clothes she wears in our shoot, which were sourced from slow-fashion designers like Mara Hoffman, Brother Vellies, and Tome, which all prioritize ethical production over mass consumption. For them, and for Deutch, success is all about longevity. “It means to continue to be able to work hard and be passionate and humble and do what you love.

Once our interview ends, Deutch is off to appear on Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen that evening, where she’ll sit next to The Real Housewives of New York City star Tinsley Mortimer. She admits she hadn’t watched the latest season but binged it the night before to prepare. As for me, I head to a café to finish up some writing for the day. I order an iced coffee from the barista, and he hands it to me with a plastic straw sitting on top, which is still inside its wrapper. I stare at it, debate for a moment, leave the straw on the counter, and walk away.

Gallery Links:

Screencaptures > Photoshoots > 2018 – Who What Wear

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2018 > Who What Wear

June 6,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

LA Times – The dramedy “The Year of Spectacular Men” is a family affair. The film, which opens Friday, was directed by actress Lea Thompson and written by her daughter Madelyn Deutch, who also wrote the music and costars in the film with her sister Zoey Deutch, who co-produced it along with their father, director Howard Deutch.

So what’s it like to work on a labor of love with your family? We asked all three to write about the experience.

Lea Thompson, director:

From its first breath as just a title, “The Year of Spectacular Men” has been a part of our family for over four years.When Madelyn let me read the first draft, I was blown away by her skill and honesty. I had never directed a feature and I was honored she trusted me enough to partner up. When it actually came together, I knew it was important to create a space for my young writer to tell her own story with her own words because in my ingenue days every one of my words was written by an older man.

I envisioned it to be elegantly shot — the sets would be lush and tell their own stories. The “Spectacular Men” would each be distinctly wonderful, and we would shoot it as written, in four cities (New York, Lake Tahoe, San Francisco and L.A.) in all four seasons. All that for the same budget that “Dancing with the Stars” has for sequins.

Thankfully, our producers at Parkside Pictures were amazing and so committed to the difficult scope of our project. And we had such a fantastic cast — Avan Jogia, Nicholas Braun, Jesse Bradford, Cameron Monaghan, Brandon T. Jackson, Zach Roerig — and crew, who somehow trusted us enough to sign on to such a unique collaboration between family members — the kind of thing that could end in tragedy, but luckily it was some kind of wonderful.

The creation of this film has taught me so much about myself, my craft, and most importantly, the mysterious inner workings of my daughters’ minds. After working in the arts for over 40 years, it has been invigorating to not only learn new things but to get my chance to help create something new from scratch, and tell a fresh story using all that I have been given from the thousands of people I have worked with as a dancer, singer, actress and director.Making this film with my daughters, whom I deeply respect and admire, is a blessing come true. And also … #funfact: “Daughter” and “laughter” are just one letter apart.

Madelyn Deutch, writer, composer, costar:

Making “The Year of Spectacular Men” felt like being a little kid again. Every room we went in told us female-fronted comedies were the riskiest investments. But the more we were told no, the scrappier we got, the harder we trudged. So you can imagine that by the time we sheer-willed our way onto set, it felt like we had tricked the establishment and gotten away with it.

Here we were, with a female director and producer and writer and composer and … it was a snow day. It was ditching school for the beach. Playing hooky sans consequences. A series of small miracles that deter you from your ordinary. The best damn sleep-away camp of your life — and you didn’t even get homesick.

I remember crying when we wrapped shooting in San Francisco. I had just done one of my last scenes as “Izzy,” the film’s lead, and I had no idea how to say goodbye to her. She became that friend from camp I shared the same scrapes and inside jokes with, who was down to drink too much Captain and Coke, and braid tacky rainbow-colored lanyards. The friend who slept in the top bunk with me, even though she had her own. I didn’t want to climb down that ladder and go back to trying to be an adult.

Still, I feel so much joy for what we accomplished. Completing a project like this is often a years long journey and I’m proud that our mission statement remains true: We made the movie we intended to make.

Of course, myself and my character Izzy are examples of privilege, of a snapshot into a pretty particular world — but we were also just young women. With self-esteem deficits, buried trauma and a skillfully uncalculated approach. Universal things as far as I could tell. So, that was the film that I wrote. It was the film we shot. The film we cut. The film we sold. The film that’s being released. Our consistent dedication to seeing that specific vision through, may be the element I’m most impressed by. And the fact that I have a mother and sister who were willing to do it with me.

Zoey Deutch, costar, producer :

“The Year of Spectacular Men” is about as grassroots and personal as it gets. I mean, my mom directed it, my sister wrote, starred in and scored it, my ex-boyfriend played my boyfriend, I produced alongside my dad. And everyone still speaks, and no one lost any limbs, and we made a really good film.

It’s hard to know how influential or special something will be while you’re doing it, and so hard to appreciate and practice gratitude in the moment… Life is cumulative: It’s all the tiny little things along the way. But when I watched the movie for the first time, it wasn’t all the decisions of filmmaking I was reminded of that made this piece of art something I’m so proud of. It was the family dinners my parents were so adamant we had together every night growing up. It was the strength of my parents’ choice to not squash me and my sister’s spirits. It was the arguments we had but worked through and didn’t ignore. It was forgiveness. It was the love and support our family has had for one another. It’s all the tiny little things along the way.

As artists who have chosen collaborative art forms, we are so used to being at the mercy of many strangers’ opinions, wants and decisions. Making this film was empowering because it gave us control and showed us we could do it. It gave us the confidence to tell our fellow artists and friends who feel overwhelmed by the process, that they can do it too.

It seems impossible, until it’s done, until you do it.

We did do it… and Deutch Family Films is just getting started.

June 6,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

Zoey Deutch attended the Los Angeles Confidential Celebration for its May/June Issue with Cover Star Zoey Deutch at Montage Beverly Hills on May 31, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California.

Check the pics in our gallery:

Gallery Links:

Public Appearances > 2018 > May 31 – Los Angeles Confidential Celebrates its May/June Issue in Beverly Hills

May 5,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

Coveteur – When we meet up with Zoey Deutch, the actress, director, and budding producer is in her room at Hotel du Cap Eden Roc in Antibes, France, with a wide view of the Mediterranean from her balcony. Cannes, where the annual film festival is about to begin, is so close we can see it across the water. But tonight Deutch is getting ready for a party inland with Dior, who is hosting her in France and dressing her for a party celebrating the Miss Dior fragrance. Her makeup is already finished with a rust-toned eyeshadow (from Dior palettes Heat Up and Inflame) by makeup artist Kelsey Deenihan. It gives an edge to her otherwise pristine white-and-black ensemble and plays off her signature red hair—a color, we learn, that was blended by Hollywood’s favorite colorist, Tracey Cunningham.

She gives me the formulas for local colorists to use when I’m filming in another city, or she gives me the dye so I can do my own roots,” says Deutch, hopping from a chair where her hairstylist just finished a few face-framing waves. “I’ve gotten really good at doing my own roots.

The favor is particularly appreciated these days, as 24-year-old Deutch finds herself on more and more sets both in front of the camera and behind it. Last year she saw the release of five of her films, including her producing credit for The Year of Spectacular Men, and this year she already has two films in post-production. Later, when we meet with Deutch again at the party, we’re at Christian Dior’s former home in Grasse, Château de La Colle Noire, and take a seat side by side on what used to be Dior’s own bed. We, of course, have plenty of questions queuing in our head—from the frivolous How do you get that *skin*? to the nosy What’s like to grow up in Hollywood with a legendary mom like Lea Thompson? to the selfish What are your best career secrets? And we got the answers for you below.

Can you tell me a little bit about growing up with parents in the entertainment industry, and the career wisdom you learned from them?

“It’s been my great fortune to be surrounded by people that have reminded me of how important process is, not outcome. When you’re an actor, or really an artist of a collaborative form, you have so little control of the outcome. And if you are only focused on that…it won’t turn out well [laughs]. If you’re focused on the outcome, chances are you’re focused on people’s perceptions of the outcome—how much money something makes, how it looks, rather than how it feels. And I think that has been the most valuable—one of the most valuable—lessons I’ve learned is to really appreciate, recognize, and practice the process, not the outcome.”

Do you think this is part of why you’re getting more and more into producing?

“Yeah, I think it was something that I realized I loved so much. And it gives me an opportunity to have some semblance of control. I also enjoy being a part of every single piece of the puzzle. It’s fun for me.”

And I sense that you have a very clear vision:

“I do, but I think more important than that is learning how to harness that and listen to other people. I think it’s really easy to have a vision. But again, when you’re an artist and you’ve chosen a collaborative art form as your path, it’s massively important to be not just a good listener, but to learn how to listen. I don’t know if that makes any sense.”

Have you noticed that there is a difference in the creative process, like when somebody really knows how to listen?

“Yeah, I also think—I don’t know if you feel like this in your experience, and your career and life… I hate to put people into categories, but there are people that allow other people to do their jobs, and then there are other people that micromanage other people doing their jobs. And it’s a really fine balance because if you really are somebody that wants to have a hand in every single pie, and wants to be a part of the whole process… It’s a really delicate line to balance.”

Do you feel like you’ve been able to kind of gain a lot of wisdom from your parents and your family?

“To be entirely honest, I think it’s hard to have perspective on that. I’ve always been very honest about feeling deep gratitude to my parents for being really good people and really good at their jobs, so it didn’t steer me away. I knew that it was possible to be in this industry and it not be a complete shit-show. Both my parents are nice, and they work so hard. And it really is about process, not outcome, for them. I’ve just watched them be good humans [laughs].”

Is there a subject that you’re really passionate about right now?

“I think it’s really crazy that there haven’t been movies made about Margaret Sanger or Hedy Lamarr… I just think that that’s interesting.”

OK! Change of subject. Favorite beauty go-tos… We were talking about coloring your own hair:

“Me and my mom do my sister’s hair, and they’re a brunette and a blonde. We have our little salon. We do my mom’s roots and the whole thing [laughs]. We’re mixing colors and throwing shit [laughs].”

Do you have a skin routine that you swear by?

“Do you have an hour and a half [laughs]? I go to [facialist] Shani Darden. I have struggled in the past with hormonal stuff. I really like IS Clinical—their cleanser and their active serum is fantastic. I just started using the Sisley—the Black Rose moisturizer—and I love that. It’s a cream. But I’m very hesitant toward scented moisturizers. I usually am just like, ‘Screw it. I’m going for Cetaphil.’ I don’t want to risk it. I am a new lover of [Sisley]. I haven’t tried anything else except that moisturizer. I’m obsessed with it. Honestly, I love witch hazel. I know it sounds like a bizarre drugstore thing. Witch hazel as a toner. It is very intense. It closes your pores.”

Do you wear makeup?

“I love the Dior eyebrow pencil because it has a little brush on the back. I love peach shadows. And then I use the Dior [Undercover Star Concealer] wand for my skin, and then I use Clé de Peau concealer for under the eyes.”

For fragrance, you said you’ve long worn Miss Dior:

“I know, it’s like, ‘Really, Zoey?’ I know it seems overly fitting. I refuse to throw out any of the Miss Dior bottles because they have the little bows on them. I actually tried to break one so that I could put like, roses in it. And they are very sturdy bottles. I think it broke part of the wall instead of the actual bottle. I alternate my fragrance. I wear Miss Dior, but I also wear Lys 41 Le Labo. [I like] very floral. I don’t like a musk sort of thing. I really love roses. I love roses and gardenias and peonies, and that sort of feminine, beautiful kind of thing.”

Gallery Links:

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2018 > Coveteur

May 5,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

Unafraid and unrehearsed, Zoey Deutch is the most down-to-earth rising star born to two ’80s Hollywood powerhouses you’ll ever meet.

Zoey Deutch is stuck in traffic. The Los Angeles native is clearly accustomed to gridlock, because she proceeds to describe it over the phone with the smooth and appraising air of a connoisseur. “I’m not sure if you’re familiar with L.A. traffic, but it is the most fun,” she jokes. “A thrill.” Seconds later, the actress briefly interrupts our conversation to honk at an aggressive driver who has just darted into her lane (I can hear the beep of her horn—it’s quick and direct, as even-tempered and levelheaded as a honk can get). “I’m so sorry this is happening,Deutch apologizes. “Thank you for going with it. You’re so nice.

For the record, Deutch is the nice one. The 23-year-old actress seems genuinely concerned about me, and I’m genuinely concerned about… me. I want to ask Deutch about her latest projects, her meteoric ascent to stardom, but haven’t found an artful way to steer the conversation away from traffic (“Hey, you know what isn’t stuck in the slow lane? Your career!”). And because Deutch is a busy actress with a very busy schedule, I’m keenly aware that every passing moment is a missed opportunity. So I blurt out a question about the Academy Awards, which Deutch recently attended in an eco-conscious couture gown by Elie Saab—a look that was put together by her stylist, Elizabeth Stewart, and roundly praised by the fashion community. “That was so powerful,Deutch says of the Oscars. “I was able to watch all of my heroes celebrate their work. And then I got to mingle and trip over things and desperately search for snacks.

And there it is. Into this static-filled connection, Deutch reveals all of the qualities that make her a rare and compelling figure in Hollywood. She’s a major star without a major ego, a leading lady who can appreciate both high art and snack food. She stays grounded in the glare of the spotlight and seems to have a natural immunity to hype.

The question is: How?

The daughter of actress Lea Thompson (Back to the Future) and director Howard Deutch (Pretty in Pink), Zoey Deutch grew up in the San Fernando Valley “surrounded by cool artists.” I ask Deutch if she thinks her close proximity to the business might account for her pragmatic view of it. “Look, all artists pull from their personal experiences, and anyone who tells you that isn’t the case is out of their mind,” she says. “But growing up in this business definitely gave me a unique perspective on the job. I learned early on to value preparation. I take that seriously.

In other words, Deutch does her homework—and it shows. The young actress has built an impressive catalog of work since her big-screen debut in 2013’s Beautiful Creatures, in which she holds her own alongside the likes of Emma Thompson, Viola Davis and Jeremy Irons. But it’s in the new indie film Flower that Deutch finds a vehicle for her startling versatility and is able to display her deep commitment to her craft. Deutch plays Erica Vandross, a proudly irreverent 17-year-old who uses her sexuality to extort money from older, ostensibly powerful men who take advantage of people. “The character felt so complicated, frustrating and fragile to me,” says Deutch. “My initial thoughts when I read the script were, ‘I can’t believe they’re going to let me make a movie where the central character gets to do this kind of stuff and talk like that.’ I feel like I’ve been sitting on the sidelines watching all my male actor friends get to play parts like this.

To prepare for what she calls a “dream role, Deutch read books on “teenage angst and struggle,” such as Beatrice Sparks’ Go Ask Alice and Mary Pipher’s Reviving Ophelia. She and director Max Winkler researched borderline personality disorder (“I feel strongly that Erica suffers from it”) and attended a therapy session together. “I was half my character and half myself, and the therapist knew I was playing a part in Max’s film. I know it sounds silly, but it was awesome.

While Deutch tapped into her character’s psychology, the film itself taps into the zeitgeist. “We made this movie before the Harvey story broke,Deutch says, referring to the allegations of sexual assault brought against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein that prompted the global #MeToo movement. “It’s not a secret that this business has a very unequal power struggle and that women have been taken advantage of and preyed upon for as long as its inception. And this movie was written as a way to capture that feeling of powerlessness. It’s not like my character handles it in a productive way—she doesn’t. And even though the movie doesn’t provide answers, it reflects how women want to get some kind of control over their lives.

The message resonates with Deutch, who is an ardent supporter of women’s rights and the Time’s Up campaign against gender discrimination. I ask her if she feels a certain responsibility as a young woman actor to keep the momentum going, and to push hard for change both inside and outside her industry. Her answer is startling—and heartening. “A responsibility? Maybe. But I think what’s even more powerful is that I feel inspired and encouraged to be a strong, independent person. It’s not that I’m being forced to take a stand. I’m excited for the future.

The future may be fixed in her gaze, but Deutch is still committed to realizing longtime goals. Her upcoming project,Set It Up on Netflix, is the result of a pact she and her Everybody Wants Some!! co-star Glen Powell formed a few years ago. “Glen and I vowed that we would find a smart, funny romantic comedy and then we would make it. And we freaking did it.” In the film, Deutch and Powell play overworked, undervalued assistants who coax (read: trap) their bosses into a romantic relationship in order to score a little free time for themselves. The story is lighthearted, playful and easy to digest, but it still manages to unravel stubborn stereotypes, most notably, the cliché of the one-note female love interest. “I feel like it’s a truly feminist version of a romantic comedy,” says Deutch, whose character, Harper, provides the comedic and dramatic substance of the story. “I’ve played a one-dimensional female character in a male-driven comedy before, and that is a very difficult thing to do well,” she says. “You know that famous line about how there are no small parts, only small actors? I think that’s bullshit. As an actor, you really are at the mercy of the words you’re given to say. I will try to follow the well-written word. But I won’t try to manipulate a path for my career. I want to have the opportunity to play different people and keep mixing it up. That’s important to me.

One thing’s for certain: Whichever path or direction Deutch decides to take, the actress will most definitely be in the driver’s seat. Don’t try cutting her off.

Ocean Drive – By Liana Schaffner – Photographed by Tony Duran.

April 4,2018 • admin • 0 Comments

The Last Magazine – If most teen movies are concerned with a loss of innocence, then Max Winkler’s new film Flower, out this week and starring Zoey Deutch, is not your typical teen movie. In Flower, the 23-year-old Deutch plays Erica Vandross, a seventeen-year-old whose sexual confidence far outstrips her certainty in other parts of life. Her modus operandi is to offer blow jobs to men she can extort for money, saving up so that she can bail her father out of jail. The film starts with her giving one of these blow jobs to a policeman (“Where’d you learn to give head like that?” he gasps. “Middle school,” she says impassively) and ends with a visit to prison. In between, there’s a crusade to bring down a male teacher that her stepbrother Luke, played by Joey Morgan, has accused of molestation as well as a Thelma and Louise-esque escape attempt, with Luke and Erica speeding across a Joshua tree-punctuated landscape in a stolen Saab convertible and dressed in clothes seemingly inspired by Floridian retirees—Erica in particular has a penchant for flamingo-colored sunglasses and palm-tree prints. The showdown, when it comes, is emotional, not physical, and involves a seemingly innocuous moment that causes Erica to break down in Luke’s arms.

I think that ultimately most movies portray vulnerability as a loss of innocence, but by the end of this movie, it’s the opposite direction,” says Deutch, who in real life speaks with the same breakneck cadence as her character. Though the plot is driven largely by some decisions of dubious morality on Erica’s part, the audience feels at least empathetic, if not quite sympathetic, toward her—a fact that speaks volumes about Deutch’s ability to tap into the subtleties of being human and, more specifically, a teenager who’s desperately trying to cover her fear of abandonment. “You have to believe that beyond all of Erica’s bravado there’s this fragile girl,” points out Deutch. “A movie like Flower is about the regaining of innocence and about the learning process of allowing yourself to be vulnerable.

Deutch has Hollywood running through her veins—her parents are director Howard Deutch and actress/director Lea Thompson, while her sister, Madelyn, is also an actress—and may have dabbled briefly in competitive jazz dance growing up (Thompson also briefly flirted with a career in dancing before turning to acting), but she always knew she wanted to act. At the prestigious Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, she majored in both performance and visual arts. “I have an immense amount of gratitude for being surrounded by so many people who do similar, like-minded things,” she says. She started acting nearly ten years ago, with her first part on the Disney Channel’s The Suite Life on Deck, but more recent roles have included the love interest and only female in the main cast of Richard Linklater’s Eighties frat-house film Everybody Wants Some!!, a redeemed bully in the teen drama Before I Fall, and the socialite Oona O’Neill, girlfriend of Nicholas Hoult’s JD Salinger, in the biopic Rebel in the Rye. Later this year, she will appear in The Year of Spectacular Men alongside her sister, who also wrote the script and score. The film was directed by her mother. (“Everybody always wants some kind of dirty detail—I would too, a mother and two sisters made a movie!—but the truth is, we got along really well and respected each other throughout the entire process,” she has previously said.)

But despite this show reel, Deutch says that Flower’s Erica was her “dream role. “The character felt so complicated and frustrating and vulnerable, and I’d watched so many of my male friends get these types of roles,” she says. “I think there’s a lot of strength in vulnerability.”

The movie was shot over only seventeen days, a short amount of time to ask actors to form any sort of bond together, but a lot of the work was done beforehand. Deutch cites texts such as Go Ask Alice, about a fifteen-year-old teenage runaway who develops a drug habit, and Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls, a 1994 analysis by therapist Mary Pipher of the depression, eating disorders, and low self-esteem she saw in her young female clients, as being key to helping her understand what she saw as Erica’s personality disorder. “How I interpreted it was that Erica is somebody who makes serious efforts to avoid abandonment and she has this distorted sense of self,” she says. “She has patterns of unstable relationships in her life.” With Winkler’s approval, she attended therapy, answering questions as if she were Erica. The therapist, she says, knew that her name was Zoey and that she would play the role of Erica in Flower but didn’t know that Deutch was attempting to actually personify Erica during their sessions. “We wanted her opinion firsthand on what she thought if I was Erica.”

That Deutch embodies the fragile world of her character so completely and so easily is the result of an environment where she didn’t feel intimidated to do what needed to be done. It was also the first time she’d worked with a female cinematographer, Carolina Costa, who was responsible for the hazy, sun-bleached visual direction of the film. “Not only did she make me feel safe, she made me feel supported, and I loved the freedom that she gave me to move around,Deutch says.

Overall, according to Deutch, the writers and Winkler were collaborative and open, and she never felt like she couldn’t voice an opinion, particularly if she thought her character would do or say something different. Prior to shooting, she was encouraged to spend a lot of time with Maya Eshet and Dylan Gelula, who play her best friends Claudine and Kala in the film. The trio would go to the mall “and get milkshakes together” and scour vintage stores to find clothes they thought their characters would wear. “Max was really adamant that he wanted every fiber of my DNA to go into this,Deutch says. The actress also helped design Erica’s bedroom, working with the designers and artists who created it. “Ultimately, whether we realized it or not, this allowed us to feel very comfortable in a really organic way.”

For Deutch, the research has always been part of the appeal. For the role of Oona O’Neill (daughter of Eugene) in Rebel in the Rye, she delighted in delving into a world that was so well documented and threw herself into learning about elite New York society in the Forties. “Here’s this person, O’Neill, and she was taking voice lessons, she had this affected Atlantic accent, she took these etiquette classes, she would drink a martini and smoke a cigarette,” she says. “It was a very interesting world. It was the first time I’d played a real person, and there was that pressure that goes with playing a real person—it becomes a part of their history, and you want to do justice to that.

Doing justice to her characters is a theme throughout Deutch’s performances. There’s a clear line of empathy that runs through her roles as she brings them to life and injects them with depth. Growing up, she admired the 1937 Katharine Hepburn film Stage Door for the intensity of its characters. Like real humans, none of the women in the film are objectively good or bad people, but rather, inhibit a world of nuance. Deutch knows, too, that Erica is not perfect, “but being able to live with her and being really able to understand why she does what she does was really important to me,” she says. “Nothing Erica does in the movie is ever spontaneous.

Flower is out Friday.